Category Archives: Department of Labor

DOL Withdraws Joint Employer, Independent Contractor Guidance

600px-US-DeptOfLabor-Seal_svgEarlier today, U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta announced the withdrawal of the U.S. Department of Labor’s informal guidance on joint employment and independent contractors issued during the Obama administration. The announcement states that the withdrawal does not “change the legal responsibilities of employers under the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act” and that the DOL “will continue to fully and fairly enforce all laws within its jurisdiction.” We will keep you updated on any additional word from the DOL on these issues, but it appears that by withdrawing these guidelines, the new administration is taking a first step away from attempts of the Obama administration and the NLRB to expand concepts of joint employment.

DOL Releases Final Rule On Paid Sick Leave For Employees Of Federal Contractors

600px-US-DeptOfLabor-Seal_svgOn September 29th, the Department of Labor released its final rule requiring federal contractors to provide their employees with at least 1 hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours of work, up to a maximum of 56 hours (7 days) per year.

The rule officially implements President Obama’s 2015 executive order. Once formally published in the Federal Register (which is expected to happen in the next few days), the rule will go into effect 60 days after publication. Federal contractors should take note and ensure compliance with this rule.

 

 

Challenges to DOL’s New Overtime Pay Rules Continue

houseLogoPrintCongress has joined the fight in trying to stop or delay the Department of Labor’s new overtime regulations. This week, the U.S. House of Representatives voted 246 to 177 to delay the effective date of the DOL’s overtime rule by six months until June 1, 2017. This bill faces an uphill battle — first having to pass the Senate and then a very likely Presidential veto.

Given that the bill is unlikely to become law, and given the questionable future of pending court challenges, employers should continue to prepare for the new regulations to be effective on December 1st.  We will continue to monitor these challenges and keep you apprised.

States and Business Groups File Suit Challenging DOL’s New Overtime Regulations

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This week, 21 states and over 50 business groups filed suit in the Eastern District of Texas challenging the Department of Labor’s new overtime regulations, arguing that the DOL overstepped its authority in establishing the new minimum salary level and the automatic increases to the minimum salary every 3 years.
The new regulations (which,as we have previously discussed, more than double the minimum salary requirement for employees to be eligible for the administrative, professional and executive overtime exemptions) have been hotly contested — in Congress and now in the courts.  But it is far from clear that any of the efforts to delay or stop the new standards will be effective.
We will continue to monitor these challenges and keep you apprised. However, unless and until a challenge is successful, employers should plan to be ready for the new regulations on December 1st.

New Overtime Regulations More Than Double Minimum Salary Threshold Effective December 1st

Under final overtime regulations set to be published today, the new minimum salary for employees to be exempt from overtime under the “white collar” exemptions will more than double — to $913/week , which is $47,476/year — with further increases every 3 years thereafter, beginning on January 1, 2020.  The new regulations will become effective on December 1, 2016.

In a positive development, according to the Department of Labor’s (DOL) overview and summary of the new rule, employers will be permitted to credit bonuses and incentive payments for up to 10% of the new required minimum salary.

According to the DOL’s summary, the new regulations contain the following changes:

  • Increase of minimum salary for “white collar” exemptions from $455/week ($23,660/year) to $913/week ($47,476/year) — which is the 40th percentile for full-time salaried workers in the lowest-wage Census region (currently, the South).
  • Increase in the salary threshold for the Highly Compensated Employee exemption from $100,000 to $134,000 — which is currently the 90th percentile for full-time salaried workers nationally (note that the Highly Compensated Employee exemption isn’t effective in a number of states, including Illinois).
  • Automatic increases in the salary minimums every 3 years, with the first increase effective January 1, 2020.  For the regular “white collar” exemptions, the minimum salary will increase the  to the 40th percentile for full-time salaried workers in the lowest-wage Census region (estimated to be $51,168 in 2020).  For the Highly Compensated Employee exemption, it will increase to the 90th percentile of full-time salaried workers nationally (estimated to be $147,524 in 2020).
  • Up to 10% of the minimum salary for the regular “white collar” exemptions can be met with non-discretionary bonuses, incentive pay, or commissions, provided that they are paid at least quarterly.
  • The job duties tests remain unchanged.

The Department of Labor estimates that 4.2 million workers will be impacted by the new regulations.

While December seems like a long time away, changes to compensation structures take time.  In order to have all options available, companies need to start thinking now (if they haven’t already) about how the new regulations will impact their workforce and how they are going to react.  We strongly recommend that you speak with your employment attorney to determine the best course of action for your company.

 

New Overtime Regulations Closer to Reality

The long-awaited new overtime regulations took a big step forward this week when the Department of 600px-US-DeptOfLabor-Seal_svgLabor submitted the proposed final regulations to the White House Office of Management and Budget for final review and approval.  This last step in the review process is anticipated to take up to 90 days, with the final regulations anticipated sometime during Q2.

As we noted in our post on June 30, 2015, the proposed regulations more than double the minimum salary requirement for the “white collar” overtime exemptions (administrative, professional and executive) from $455/week ($23,660/year) to approximately $970/week ($50,440/year), with annual increases thereafter based on a to-be-determined index.  The proposed regulations also increase the minimum salary for the Highly Compensated Employee exemption from $100,000/year to more than $122,000/year (though it is important to note that this exemption does not apply under some states’ overtime laws).  Finally, while the proposed regulations did not change the job duties tests, they did suggest that the final rules may impact the job duties tests in addition to the minimum salary requirement.

There are various strategies available to businesses to minimize the financial, operational and employee-relations impact of the new regulations, but it is important to act quickly to consider available options for impacted employees.  Companies should also consider whether other changes to exempt status classifications make sense, as the regulatory change is a good opportunity to improve compliance across the board.

DOL Speaks On Joint Employer Relationships

600px-US-DeptOfLabor-Seal_svgThe U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has issued guidelines for when companies will be considered joint employers for purposes of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act (MSPA). This guidance was issued in the wake of the National Labor Relations Board’s crucial Browning-Ferris ruling this past summer, drastically expanding who may be considered a joint employer under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

The DOL guidelines discuss in detail a wide variety of employment relationships, including shared employees, subcontracted employees, staffing agencies, third-party management companies, and others. According to the DOL, the “possibility of joint employment should be regularly considered in FLSA and MSPA cases, particularly where (1) the employee works for two employers who are associated or related in some way with respect to the employee [i.e. horizontal joint-employment]; or (2) the employee’s employer is an intermediary or otherwise provides labor to another employer [i.e. vertical joint employment].” Although not new, the guidelines set forth in detail various factors to be used in determining joint employer status.

As with the Browning-Ferris decision, the DOL guidance is particularly important for companies that work with subcontractors or staffing firms, or are themselves contractors or staffing firms. These companies, as well as others in similar relationships, should carefully review the guidelines, weigh the benefits of control against the risk of being deemed to be a joint employer, and reflect their desired balance in their contracts, practices and procedures.