Category Archives: Overtime Pay

New Overtime Regulations Closer to Reality

The long-awaited new overtime regulations took a big step forward this week when the Department of 600px-US-DeptOfLabor-Seal_svgLabor submitted the proposed final regulations to the White House Office of Management and Budget for final review and approval.  This last step in the review process is anticipated to take up to 90 days, with the final regulations anticipated sometime during Q2.

As we noted in our post on June 30, 2015, the proposed regulations more than double the minimum salary requirement for the “white collar” overtime exemptions (administrative, professional and executive) from $455/week ($23,660/year) to approximately $970/week ($50,440/year), with annual increases thereafter based on a to-be-determined index.  The proposed regulations also increase the minimum salary for the Highly Compensated Employee exemption from $100,000/year to more than $122,000/year (though it is important to note that this exemption does not apply under some states’ overtime laws).  Finally, while the proposed regulations did not change the job duties tests, they did suggest that the final rules may impact the job duties tests in addition to the minimum salary requirement.

There are various strategies available to businesses to minimize the financial, operational and employee-relations impact of the new regulations, but it is important to act quickly to consider available options for impacted employees.  Companies should also consider whether other changes to exempt status classifications make sense, as the regulatory change is a good opportunity to improve compliance across the board.

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Webinar – Back to School: Employment Law Update

school-suppliesAs fall approaches and students head back to school, The Employment Lawyers are taking a look back and a look ahead at issues in labor and employment law. Join us for an informational webinar to review developments over the past year and discuss tips to keep your workplace practices current in the coming year.

Thursday, September 17, 2015
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm (CDT)
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

TOPICS

  • Proposed changes to overtime regulations that will make more employees overtime-eligible
  • New standards in accommodating religious practices and pregnancy
  • The NLRB’s “quickie” election rules and what they mean for union organizing efforts
  • Raising the standard to establish that a worker is properly classified as an independent contractor
  • The EEOC’s new position on wellness programs and disability discrimination
  • Expanding employee retaliation and whistleblower claims
  • New state and local laws that impact minimum wage, paid sick leave and accommodation requirements

And more…

CLE Credit Available | This program has been submitted to the HR Certification Institute for review.

QUESTIONS

Contact Annie Darmofal at 312.476.7626 or adarmofal@lplegal.com

DOL Announces New Proposed Minimum Salary for Overtime Exemptions

600px-US-DeptOfLabor-Seal_svgThis morning the Department of Labor announced that it is seeking to increase the number of employees eligible for overtime pay by increasing the minimum salary required if an employee is to be considered exempt under the administrative, executive and professional exemptions.  The proposed increase would take the minimum annualized salary from $23,660 to $50,440.  In addition, under the proposed rule the threshold for the FLSA’s Highly Compensated Employee exemption would rise from $100,000 to $122,148.  Both the minimum salary and the Highly Compensated Employee threshold would be indexed for inflation. The DOL also suggested that it may seek other changes to limit the available overtime exemptions.  If this change becomes a final rule, we would expect it to become effective in 2016.

Note that even if employees meet the higher minimum salary requirement, they still must meet the other requirements for exempt status — being paid on a salary basis and satisfying one of the duties tests — to qualify as exempt from overtime requirements.

No action is necessary at the moment as the proposed rule is not final.  We will keep you updated on future developments.