Tag Archives: NLRA

More from the New NLRB

National_Labor_Relations_Board_logo_-_colorJust a day after the newly Republican-majority National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) restored its “direct and immediate control” test for joint employer status and implemented a new employer-friendly test for handbook policies, it took two more big steps:  overturning a ruling limiting the changes employers can unilaterally implement in union workplaces and disallowing so-called “micro-units”.

In its decision regarding unilateral changes, the Board restored old precedent that permits employers to unilaterally change policies without the union’s permission – and without first bargaining with the union – if they have taken similar actions in the past.

In its decision regarding micro-units, the Board overturned its 2011 decision that made it easier for unions to organize very small groups of employees (which, in turn, made it easier for unions to get a foothold in an otherwise non-union company).  Instead, under the Board’s decision Friday, the old standard – where employers could establish that all employees sharing a community of interest should be included in the same unit – once again stands, and the playing field between unions and employers has become a bit more level.

These rulings aren’t surprising. As we wrote last week, we expect that the trend of employer-friendly decisions will continue, so stay tuned.

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Two Big Moves By New NLRB

National Labor Relations Board Building SignThe newly Republican-majority National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has been busy — just yesterday  overturning two employee-friendly standards.

First, the Board overturned its decision in Browning-Ferris, which said that “indirect control” or the ability to exert such control over another company’s workers is sufficient to make a you a joint employer. With this ruling, the Board returned to its more employer-friendly joint employer standard, which looks to “direct and immediate” control.

Second, the Board reversed its aggressive position on employee handbook policies and provisions. Previously, the Board had held that a policy is illegal if employees could “reasonably construe” it to prohibit them from exercising their rights to come together (or collectively bargain) under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). This standard had been used by the board to find many employer policies (such as social media and confidentiality policies) illegal. However, per yesterday’s decision, the Board will instead be focusing on the “nature and extent” of a challenged policy’s “potential impact on NLRA rights” and the “legitimate justifications associated with the rule” — which together make for a far more pro-employer approach.

Employers now find themselves in a far better position when it comes to joint employer claims and handbook policy challenges. We expect to see additional employer-friendly decisions soon, so stay tuned.

Facebook Comments and “Likes“ Protected Activity?

Social Media keyboard

Is commenting on a Facebook post protected, concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act?  What about hitting the “Like” button on a post?  The Second Circuit recently agreed with the National Labor Relations Board that they are.

In a decision last year, the Board ruled that a sports bar had unlawfully terminated two employees for their activity on Facebook.  The first employee had commented on a status update of a co-worker stating that the bar’s owners “couldn’t even do the tax paperwork correctly” and that someone should do the owners “a favor” and purchase the business from them.  The employee’s comment stated that she “owed too,” and referred to one of the owners as an “asshole.”  The second employee “liked” the first employee’s status update.  The Board held that both employees’ had engaged in protected, concerted activity under the Act, and that the bar had violated the Act when it terminated their employment.

Last month, the Second Circuit (Connecticut, New York, and Vermont) affirmed the Board’s decision.  The court held that the employees’ actions amounted to a group of employees discussing labor issues and were protected by the Act.  The bar argued that the Facebook comment and “like” were meant to defame the bar – with the use of profanity – and thus brought it outside the protections of the Act.  However, the court reasoned that the Facebook activity at issue was different from obscenities voiced by employees in earshot of customers in a crowded shop (even though customers could view the comments on Facebook).  The court also noted that the bar’s internet and blogging policy could be read as prohibiting employees from protected activity under the Act.

The take-away here?  It’s a good time for employers to review their social media policies.  As we have warned in the past, these policies as written and as enforced must not “chill” employees from engaging in protected, concerted activity.  There is often a fine-line between lawfully prohibiting certain types of activities on the internet and unlawfully interfering with employees’ protected activity.  It’s a good idea to check with counsel on how to best craft the wording of these policies to protect the employer’s interests while not interfering with employees’ rights.